How to Create an Irresistible Offer

by Alexis Rodrigo

in Internet Marketing

When a sales page is underperforming, my first response is to review the offer. Is it a no-brainer for the Ideal Customer? Is it as irresistible as ice cream on a hot summer day?
sundae

An offer can be irresistible for different reasons. The price could make it a no-brainer. For example, a special report on “101 Free and Easy Ways to Get More Traffic to Your Site” is a no-brainer at $7.

However, I don’t recommend making your price the part of your offer that seals the deal. By discounting your price, you attract those who aren’t willing to invest in you.

In addition, you train your prospects and customers to wait for promos and buy only when you’re having a sale.

So how else can you make an irresistible offer?

Here are three ideas:

1. Be desirable.

I assume you’ve done your market research and based on that, created a product/service that your Ideal Customers REALLY want.

But if nobody seems to be taking your offer, you have to go back and reevaluate: Is it something they really want? Or are you offering something your market needs but don’t realize it? Or are you offering something to the wrong market? Who really WANTS what you have?

2. Be different.

In all likelihood, you’re not offering something 100% unique. If there’s any demand at all for what you’re offering, then most likely there are others out there who are trying to cash in on that demand.

What do you do? You do exactly the opposite of what your competitors are doing! Are they selling ebooks? Then offer a physical product. Or do videos. How about group coaching? Your special approach may be just what will click with your Ideal Customer.

3. Be valuable.

Stack up the perceived value of your product/service. For example, audios and videos have a higher perceived value than PDFs. Physical products have a higher perceived value than digital products. Personal coaching or mentoring – even if it takes place virtually – is perceived to be more valuable than a home study course. Live events have higher perceived value than virtual events.

You can also add to the perceived value of your offer through your bonuses. That doesn’t mean tacking on a dozen bonuses to your product. You may actually de-value your offer by doing that.

Instead, add just a few bonuses that:

  • are relevant to your product/service
  • increase the usefulness of your product/service
  • are even more desirable to your prospects

In the final analysis, the price of your product/service should be much lower than its perceived value. If it is, then you’ve got an irresistible offer.

How’s Your Offer?

How does your offer measure up? Is it irresistible or a hard sell (that is, hard to sell)? How can you make it more irresistible? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Want to read more on this topic? I suggest:

1. “Kids Eat Free” and Other Irresistible Offers
2. The Irresistible Offer: How to Sell Your Product or Service in 3 Seconds or Less (a book by Mark Joyner)

PS: You can get a free PDF version of “The Irresistible Offer” by joining Mark Joyner’s Simpleology. I recommend it!

Creative Commons License photo credit: jenny downing

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Sarah November 18, 2010 at 4:42 am

Hi Alexis,your blog is great and offers very valuable advise.However the aesthetics make reading really uncomfortable for the eyes.The black font on the blue backgroud is very hard to distinguish.How about putting white text if you wanted to maintain the background.best regards and again,well done!

Reply

Lexi November 18, 2010 at 4:25 pm

@Sarah – Looks like my site isn’t loading up properly on your web browser. Would you happen to be using an older version of Internet Explorer, by any chance? Now I know why people say “IE is evil!”

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post:

Google+